•   George Lundberg, MD

    Research paper from the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, selected by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes:

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer. Tests for impending cervix cancer lack sensitivity and specificity. This new test promises to improve both.

    Go to full paper published in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Excerpt from Cancer Network:

    “A deep learning approach to assessing cancer outcomes appears feasible, according to results of a study in patients with lung cancer. Machine curation yielded similarly accurate assessments of progression and times to improvement and response compared with human counterparts. This development could speed up oncology care processes.

    ” ‘Important clinical end points, such as response to therapy and disease progression, are often recorded in the EHR [electronic health record] only as unstructured text,’ wrote authors led by Kenneth L. Kehl, MD, MPH, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Standards such as RECIST are not routinely applied outside of clinical trials.”

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network.

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    Can Preclinical Data Guide Clinical Cancer Therapy?

    With: Keith Flaherty, MD

    A Q&A with Keith Flaherty, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director of Developmental Therapeutics, Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital; kflaherty@mgh.harvard.edu Originally published Aug 31, 2016 Q: Under what circumstances and to what extent are you willing to take clinical actions on a cancer patient based primarily on preclinical data? A: There are two scenarios that come to mind when thinking about… Read more »

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from The New York Times:

    “One of the most important benefits of exercise is in how it reduces our risk of developing a number of types of cancer — especially colorectal cancer, which according to some estimates is the malignancy most influenced by physical activity. But how workouts guard against colon cancer remains largely unknown. Physical activity speeds the movement of waste through the intestines, as anyone who has had to hunt for a bathroom during a workout knows. But this does not seem to fully account for the protective effects of exercise. Instead, a small study published in February in The Journal of Physiology suggests we should also look to changes in our bloodstream after exercise.”

    Go to full article published by The New York Times on April 22, 2019.

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    Serious Caveats in Screening for Pancreatic Cancer

    With: Rama Gullapalli, MD, PhD

    A Q&A with Rama Gullapalli, MD, PhD; a physician-scientist in the departments of Pathology, Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of New Mexico. His research lab focuses on the role of the environment in hepatobiliary cancers. He is also a practicing molecular pathologist with an interest in emerging molecular diagnostics, next generation sequencing and bioinformatics. Email: rgullapalli@salud.unm.edu  Q: A recent New York Times… Read more »

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    Encouraging and Paying for Clinical Trials, Right to Try, and Expanded Access: Part Three

    With: Mark Shapiro, PhD

    A Q&A with Mark Shapiro, PhD,Vice President of Clinical Development at xCures, Inc., Partner at Pharma Initiatives; mshapiro@xcures.com. This is the final installment in a three-part series in which Dr. Shapiro has shared his thoughts on the question below. Read part 1 and part 2. Q: Treatment of Americans with advanced cancer is complex and challenging and can be very expensive. Many urge greater participation of such patients… Read more »

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    Encouraging and Paying for Clinical Trials, Right to Try, and Expanded Access: Part Two

    With: Mark Shapiro, PhD

    A Q&A with Mark Shapiro, PhD,Vice President of Clinical Development at xCures, Inc., Partner at Pharma Initiatives; mshapiro@xcures.com. Last week, Dr. Shapiro shared his initial thoughts on the question below. Today, he discusses issues of cost and equitable access to care. Q: Treatment of Americans with advanced cancer is complex and challenging and can be very expensive. Many urge greater participation of such patients in clinical trials. In… Read more »

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    Encouraging and Paying for Clinical Trials, Right to Try, and Expanded Access: Part One

    With: Mark Shapiro, PhD

    A Q&A with Mark Shapiro, PhD, Vice President of Clinical Development at xCures, Inc., Partner at Pharma Initiatives; mshapiro@xcures.com Q: Treatment of Americans with advanced cancer is complex and challenging and can be very expensive. Many urge greater participation of such patients in clinical trials. In general, who pays the expenses of clinical trials? And, specifically, how are the costs for Right to Try and expanded-access approaches… Read more »

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “More than 1,500 cancer care professionals are meeting in Orlando, Florida, March 21-23, for the NCCN 2019 Annual Conference, presented by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)—an alliance of 28 leading cancer centers. The conference offers more than 25 sessions presenting the latest treatment recommendations for lung, breast, prostate, colon, and other cancers, including new and emerging therapies. Other key topics include coordination of care, pain management during an opioid crisis, biosimilars, cancer-associated distress, biomarkers, genetic testing, and appropriate transition to end-of-life care. The keynote session highlights the benefits and challenges of treatment with new and innovative therapies (e.g. CAR T-cell) from the perspective of the patient and the clinicians caring for them.”

    Go to full article published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network on Mar 4, 2019.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “A new meta-analysis led by Dr. Joseph Unger of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has revealed that structural and clinical barriers prevent more than 3 out of 4 cancer patients from participating in clinical trials.

    “The study is part of an ongoing effort to understand why patient participation is so low in cancer clinical trials. Unger, a health services researcher and biostatistician who focuses on disparities in cancer research, published his findings today in JNCI, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.”

    Go to full article published by Fred Hutch News Service on Feb 19, 2019.

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