•   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Reuters:

    “A drug cocktail with Roche’s Tecentriq added two months to small-cell lung cancer patients’ lives, according to a study, aiding the Swiss group’s bid to win approval in a niche disease area before rivals that now dominate the immunotherapy market.

    “Patients with untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), where cancer has spread, lived a median 12.3 months after getting Tecentriq plus chemotherapy.”

    Go to full article published by Reuters on Sep 25, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Cancer Network:

    “Researchers found that in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a Tumor Proportion Score (TPS) ≥ 50, pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy failed to improve overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) compared with pembrolizumab alone.

    “Results from the study were presented in a poster presentation at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer, held September 23–26 in Toronto.”

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network on Sep 24, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Targeted Oncology:

    “Adult patients with ALK-positive, locally advanced or metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had not received a prior ALK inhibitor experienced a more than 50% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death with treatment with brigatinib (Alunbrig), compared with the first-line standard of care, crizotinib.

    “Brigatinib demonstrated superior progression-free survival (PFS) compared with crizotinib, corresponding to a 51% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.33-74; P = .0007), according to first interim analysis results presented at the 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine.”

    Go to full article published by Targeted Oncology on Sep 26, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Cancer Network:

    “Hyperprogressive disease (HPD) occurred more commonly among patients with pretreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving PD-1 (programmed cell death protein 1)/PD-L1 (ligand 1) inhibitors than in patients treated with chemotherapy, according to the results of a study published in JAMA Oncology.

    “Among those patients with hyperprogressive disease – defined as disease progression at first evaluation with a variation per month exceeding 50% – treated with immunotherapy there was a higher metastatic burden and poorer prognosis, compared with patients without hyperprogressive disease.”

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network on Sep 21, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Cancer Network:

    “Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) appears to be safe and effective for glioblastomas in select patients and may add an average of 2 months to life expectancy compared with the current standard of care, according to a new report published in the journal Neurosurgery.

    ” ‘We showed that the procedure is well tolerated and that recurrent patients had a meaningful clinical benefit that seems to be better when compared with previously published data on the current standard of care,’ said Eric Leuthardt, MD, senior study author and a professor of neurosurgery, neuroscience, biomedical engineering, and mechanical engineering & applied science at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.”

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network on Sep 7, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from MedPage Today:

    “The resistance mutation-targeting EGFR inhibitor osimertinib (Tagrisso) demonstrated superior activity against central nervous system (CNS) metastases as compared with chemotherapy or nonselective EGFR inhibitors, two randomized trials of patients with lung cancer showed.

    “In a comparison involving patients with untreated EGFR-mutated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the median CNS progression-free survival (PFS) was not reached in patients who received osimertinib or a first-generation EGFR inhibitor. However, the available data favored the osimertinib arm (95% CI 16.5 months to not reached versus 13.9 months to not reached, HR 0.48, 95% CI 0.26-0.86, P=0.014). Osimertinib also led to a higher response rate.”

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today on Aug 31, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •  

    Options to Treat a Glioblastoma

    With: Al Musella, DPM

    Please see our updated version of this article from Oct 1, 2020. A Q&A with Al Musella, DPM, President, Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc., Hewlett, NY; email: musella@virtualtrials.com, phone: 888-295-4740 Q: You direct an established foundation that supports research and information about brain tumors. What would you do if you yourself were diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)? A: Now… Read more »

  •  

    Patient Foundation Collaboration to Advance ONC201 in DIPG and other H3 K27M-mutant Gliomas

    Musella Foundation, Cancer Commons, xCures and Oncoceutics announced the initiation of a collaboration to develop ONC201 as a new treatment for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and other H3 K27M-mutant gliomas. Critical to the collaboration is $1M in funding from The Musella Foundation, Michael Mosier Defeat DIPG Foundation and The Cure Starts Now Foundation. Cancer Commons and xCures will contribute additional resources to the… Read more »

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from The ASCO Post:

    “Today, nivolumab (Opdivo) received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for patients with metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) whose cancer has progressed after platinum-based chemotherapy and at least one other line of therapy. Approval for this indication has been granted under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response.

    “This approval for nivolumab had been granted Priority Review from the FDA. It was based on data from the SCLC cohort of the ongoing phase I/II CheckMate-032 study evaluating nivolumab monotherapy in patients who experienced disease progression after platinum-based chemotherapy.”

    Go to full article published by The ASCO Post on Aug 17, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from The ASCO Post:

    “Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pembrolizumab (Keytruda) in combination with pemetrexed (Alimta) and platinum as first-line treatment of patients with metastatic, nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

    “Pembrolizumab was previously granted accelerated approval for this indication in May 2017 based on improvements in overall response rate and progression-free survival for patients randomized to pembrolizumab administered with pemetrexed and carboplatin as compared with pemetrexed and carboplatin alone in the KEYNOTE-021 study.”

    Go to full article published by The ASCO Post on Aug 20, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.