George Lundberg, MD Contributing Editor at Cancer Commons

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    “Pancreatic cancer is the tenth most common cancer in men and the ninth most common in women, but it is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, being responsible for 7% of all cancer-related deaths in men and 8% in women.”

    To learn more about pancreatic cancer, check out this comprehensive, credible, authoritative, up-to-date description and discussion from Medscape. (Free registration may be required to view the content.)

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    When overall clinical trial results are presented as “medians,” obviously, the same number of patients lived longer as did those who lived less long than the median. It can be useful to study the “tail” of the long survivors for clues of combinations of treatments that  may help others. A July 2019 Journal of Neuro-Oncology paper explores this topic.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    Receiving a brain tumor diagnosis can be shocking for patients and their families. The Musella Foundation’s free “Brain Tumor Guide for the Newly Diagnosed” provides up-to-date guidance for people in this difficult position.

    .

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    A brainstem glioma is a very serious disease that is rare and mostly affects children. Diffuse pontine intrinsic glioma  (DPIG) is one type of brainstem glioma. For an authoritative, up-to-date, detailed, comprehensive, and unbiased overview of brainstem gliomas, check out this presentation and discussion. (You may be required to register for free to view it.)

     

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    Most malignant brain tumors are gliomas, which begin in nerve-supporting cells known as glial cells. “Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most malignant of the glial tumors,” according to this comprehensive presentation about GBM. Check it out for an authoritative, up-to-date, detailed, unbiased perspective. (You may be required to register for free to view the presentation.)

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Excerpt from the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging:

    “A 12-year retrospective clinical study of patients who received peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for malignant neuroendocrine tumors demonstrates the long-term effectiveness of this treatment, which also allows patients to maintain a high quality of life. The study is featured in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

    “While PRRT has been used for more than 20 years to treat patients with inoperable or metastatic somatostatin receptor–positive tumors, knowledge of long-term outcomes has been limited. A number of clinical studies have demonstrated PRRT’s efficacy, and the overall response rate (including complete response, partial response, minor response, and stable disease) is about 70-80 percent for the two most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals: yttrium-90 (90Y)-DOTATOC (best suited for treating larger tumors) and lutetium-177 (177Lu)-DOTATATE (preferred for smaller tumors). For patients who respond to PRRT, the prognosis is generally favorable, with a median time to disease progression of three to four years.”

    Go to full article published by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging on April 26, 2019.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from Medical Xpress curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Ageism (bias against the elderly) is a real issue in the selection of patients to be included in clinical trials. A new study demonstrates how such bias may harm the elderly with renal cell carcinoma.

    Go to full article published by Medical Xpress.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Research paper from the Journal of the National Comprehensive Care Network curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Metastatic or advanced cervical cancer remains very difficult to treat. Immunotherapy is showing promise.

    Go to full article published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Care Network. 

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •  

    Cancer Pain and the Opioid Epidemic

    George Lundberg, MD

    A Q&A with Kevin Sevarino, MD, PhD, President-elect of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and Consulting Psychiatrist at Gaylord Hospital in Wallingford, CT Q: Opioid abuse, addiction, and overdose are huge American problems right now. Many cancer patents experience chronic pain. What is the best way to use opioids to manage chronic pain? [Note: The views expressed below represent the opinion of the author,… Read more »

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Excerpt:

    “Cancer has been called malevolent. Devious. Even ingenious. It’s actually none of these. Cancer has no purpose or direction. As these wayward cells arise, they simply adapt to the environmental conditions of the tissues in which they exist. That concept, which springs from Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution, is guiding new approaches to fighting this common and deadly disease.

    “In Darwinian evolution, organisms that are well-adapted to their environments flourish and crowd out those that aren’t. My colleagues and I believe that much the same thing happens with cancer in a process we call adaptive oncogenesis.”

    Go to full article published by STAT on Jun 27, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.