Learn about the latest treatments for advanced esophageal cancer. We’ve got it covered, from new FDA approvals to emerging approaches in immunotherapy, targeted therapy, drug combinations, and more.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center recently began recruiting patients for a phase 1 clinical trial to test a treatment in which an investigational cancer cell-killing virus called Telomelysin is directly injected into inoperable esophageal cancer tumors. Participating patients will receive this “cancer vaccine” alongside standard chemoradiation therapy.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Immuno-Oncology News reports on the European Commission’s approval of the drug nivolumab (Opdivo) for some patients with advanced esophageal cancer.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    A special issue of the research journal Annals of Esophagus curated by Contributing Editor George Lundberg, MD.

    This special issue of an academic research journal discusses “multimodality” treatment—the combination of more than one treatment—and how it is used to treat advanced esophageal cancer.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from GenomeWeb curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the drug pembrolizumab (brand name Keytruda) for solid tumors based solely on whether they have a high tumor mutational burden—a high number of changes in the DNA of the cancer cells.

    Go to full article published by GenomeWeb.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from the National Cancer Institute curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    In 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pembrolizumab for certain advanced esophageal cancers, depending on testing results. The National Cancer Institute explains here.

    Go to full article published by the National Cancer Institute.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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Cancer Commons’ scientists and doctors were very helpful in identifying possible clinical trials for our son’s rare brain tumor.

Joan
Mother of brain tumor patient

Molecular tests help match patients to the personalized treatments that are most likely to work for them. Keep up with new developments in genetic tests, tumor mutations, MSI status, other biomarkers, and additional precision-medicine strategies.

Some of the most promising new treatments for advanced esophageal cancer are currently being tested in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We help you stay up to date on the latest results from these studies.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    A blog post from the National Cancer Institute reports that two clinical trials are showing encouraging results for progression-free survival—and one for overall survival—from treatment with immunotherapy drugs in people with advanced esophageal cancer. 

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from Medscape curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    In a clinical trial that compared proton beam therapy with standard radiotherapy for esophageal cancer, the two treatments were found to be virtually identical in terms of progression-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life.

    Go to full news article published by Medscape.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Research paper from Annals of Surgery curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    This meta-analysis found that minimally invasive surgery tops open esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    Go to full paper published in Annals of Surgery.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Research paper from The Lancet curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    In this clinical trial, nivolumab was somewhat superior to chemotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma.

    Go to full paper published in The Lancet.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from MedPage Today curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer produces similar outcomes with fewer complications than open surgery. A reduction in pulmonary atelectasis may underlie these findings.

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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In a field as complex and dynamic as molecular oncology in 2020, Cancer Commons offers an amazing opportunity for patients with advanced cancer to obtain scientifically up-to-date additional options that may improve both the length and quality of their lives,... Read more »

Gavin Gordon, PhD
Molecular Pathologist

Cancer affects many aspects of life, whether you’re newly diagnosed, in the midst of treatment, or in follow-up care. Learn about ways to maintain quality of life, such as palliative care and managing side effects.

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    Pediatric Palliative Care: A Specialty Comes of Age

    Sarah Friebert, MD

    For a child with cancer, palliative care can provide much-needed relief from stress and symptoms—for the patient and their family alike. Palliative care is given alongside cancer treatment, and is not synonymous with “end-of-life” care. In fact, anyone with a… Read more »

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from Medscape curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Depression is, for obvious reasons, common in patients with advanced cancer. The old, inexpensive drug ketamine—already approved for medical use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—seems rapidly effective, according to small studies.

    Go to full article published by Medscape.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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    Emphasizing Oncogeriatrics

    With: Nicolò Matteo Luca Battisti, MD

    A Q&A with Nicolò Matteo Luca Battisti, MD, Medical Oncologist at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, and Chair of the Young Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG); nicolo.battisti@gmail.com Q: Everyone knows that… Read more »

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    Best Uses of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Patients with Cancer

    With: Val Jones, MD

    A Q&A with Val Jones, MD, Medical Director of Admissions, Saint Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute, Spokane, WA Originally published February 1, 2017 Q: Your principal practice in Spokane, Washington is physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). What do you find to be… Read more »

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    Huge Progress in Palliative Care

    With: Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP

    A Q&A with Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP, Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care; Professor of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; New York, NY; diane.meier@mssm.edu Originally published November 8, 2017 Q: You wrote in… Read more »

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    Cancer Pain and the Opioid Epidemic

    George Lundberg, MD

    A Q&A with Kevin Sevarino, MD, PhD, President-elect of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and Consulting Psychiatrist at Gaylord Hospital in Wallingford, CT Q: Opioid abuse, addiction, and overdose are huge American problems right now. Many cancer patents experience chronic… Read more »

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You’re not alone. Read how other patients and caregivers navigated diagnosis, treatment, and life with cancer. We hope their stories provide insights and hope for your own cancer journey.

More patient stories

Learn more about what’s new in advanced cancer research and treatment, including screening and statistics, using artificial intelligence to improve treatment, and other new horizons in cancer care.

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    How to Learn About Cancer in a Classroom: Shaping Compassionate Doctors

    With: Marin Langlieb

    The patients and caregivers we serve here at Cancer Commons rely on their doctors to provide expert, compassionate care. Building the skills to give such care can begin early in a doctor’s education. Here, for a change of pace, our… Read more »

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    Is Cancer the Best Way to Die?

    With: Richard Smith, CBE, FMedSci

    In 2014, the prestigious medical research journal The BMJ published a controversial piece called “Dying of cancer is the best death.” Here, our Curious Dr. George asks the author of that piece, Richard Smith, CBE, FMedSci, if and how his thoughts… Read more »

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    The Power of Precision Medicine is Exemplified by Tempus

    With: Nike Beaubier, MDNamratha Sastry, PhD

    Tempus—a tech company & partner of Cancer Commons—empowers doctors to make data-driven decisions for their patients in real time. Learn how.

  •   Lola Rahib, PhD

    Article from ASCO Daily News curated by Director of Scientific and Clinical Affairs, Lola Rahib, PhD.

    In collaboration with MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Cancer Commons presented new research at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)’s virtual 2020 meeting. The findings show that, by 2040, we will likely see notable changes in which cancer types are most common and which are most deadly, highlighting the influence of cancer screening programs. This research was led by Dr. Rahib at Cancer Commons.

    Go to full article published by ASCO Daily News.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from The ASCO Post curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    “Patients with cancer need to be embraced with love and compassion. They need caring beyond medicine.”

    Go to full article published by The ASCO Post.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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    The Challenges of Using Artificial Intelligence to Improve Cancer Treatment

    With: Razelle Kurzrock, MDJeff Shrager, PhD

    In a previous post, CureMatch co-founder Razelle Kurzrock, MD, told us all about her company’s artificial intelligence (AI) platform that matches patients with treatments based on their cancer’s molecular profile. Here, AI expert Jeff Shrager, PhD, responds, and Kurzrock offers… Read more »

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The coronavirus pandemic presents unprecedented challenges to cancer patients. We can help you understand how COVID-19 might impact your treatment and other aspects of your cancer care.