Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer

Learn about emerging treatments for metastatic prostate cancer. We’ve got it covered, from new FDA approvals to emerging approaches in hormone therapy, radiation, surgery, bone-protective treatments, immunotherapy, and more.

  • Finally: An Active Prostate Cancer Drug That Doesn’t Target Androgen

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Most of the recent developments in prostate cancer treatment have addressed the timing and duration of androgen deprivation, who should receive radiation treatments, and the timing of the few available chemotherapy options. But this month’s big news is a welcome change: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancers (mCRPCs) that harbor mutations in BRCA2 or one of a few other genes have a remarkable response to olaparib (Lynparza), a drug that inhibits the enzyme PARP1.

  • FDA Approves Merck’s Keytruda, Foundation Medicine CDx for TMB-High Solid Tumors

    George Lundberg, MD

    Article from GenomeWeb curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the drug pembrolizumab (brand name Keytruda) for solid tumors based solely on whether they have a high tumor mutational burden—a high number of changes in the DNA of the cancer cells.

    Go to full article published by GenomeWeb.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  • Prostate Cancer—An Overview

    George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes:

    Prostate cancer is the most common potentially lethal cancer diagnosed among American men. The great majority do not die of their disease. But there are many controversies about best handling. To learn more, read this authoritative, detailed presentation from Medscape, published August 2019.

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  • Prostatectomy Plus Radiotherapy May Improve Survival in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “Patients who underwent primary radical prostatectomy followed by radiotherapy for locally or regionally advanced prostate cancer had better survival outcomes than patients treated with radiotherapy plus androgen deprivation therapy, according to findings from a population-based, retrospective study published in Cancer.

    ” ‘There is a lot of debate about whether to remove the whole prostate and follow-up with radiation therapy or, as a second option, spare the prostate and treat it using radiation therapy plus hormone-blocking therapy,’ Grace Lu-Yao, PhD, associate director of population science at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health, said in a press release. ‘Our study suggests that removing the prostate followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is associated with greater OS in men with prostate cancer.’ ”

    Go to full article published by Healio on Oct 15, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

     

  • Groups Endorse Shorter RT for Prostate Cancer

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “Hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for early prostate cancer represents a reasonable alternative to standard treatment protocols involving lower doses of radiation administered over a longer period of time, according to a new clinical guideline.

    ” ‘Moderately hypofractionated’ EBRT regimens result in similar disease control and side effects as compared with conventional protocols, although the shortened regimens confer a small risk of more short-term gastrointestinal toxicity. Additionally, physicians should counsel patients about the limited data on oncologic outcomes beyond 5 years of follow-up, according to a panel representing the American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and American Urological Association.”

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today on Oct 11, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  • Deadly Subtype Makes Up 17% of Metastatic Prostate Cancers

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Healio:

    “Treatment-emergent small cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer, a particularly deadly subtype of the disease, occurs in nearly one-fifth of all cases of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, study data showed.

    “Researchers suggested that the subtype should be treated with novel targeted therapies that are currently in the development or testing phase.”

    Go to full article published by Healio on July 9, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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Keith Flaherty, MD
Cancer Commons Advisor

New Prostate Cancer Molecular Testing Options

Molecular tests help match patients to the personalized treatments that are most likely to work for them. Keep up with new developments in molecular testing that could help guide prostate cancer treatment, such as detection of genetic mutations and other biomarkers.

Latest Clinical Trial Results in Prostate Cancer

Some of the most promising new treatments for metastatic prostate cancer are currently being tested in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We help you stay up to date on the latest results from these studies.

  • Targeted Radiation Therapy Yields High Response Rates in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “The targeted radiation therapy Lutetium-177 PSMA-617 produced high response rates among men with prostate-specific membrane antigen-positive metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to results of a single-arm, phase 2 trial scheduled for presentation at Genitourinary Cancers Symposium.

    “The treatment also appeared well-tolerated among these men, whose disease had progressed after multiple standard therapies.”

    Go to full article published by Healio on Feb 14, 2019.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  • The Link Between Apalutamide and QOL in Non-Metastatic CRPC

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “Adding apalutamide to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) does not appear to harm health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in men with nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), according to new research published in Lancet Oncology.

    “Previous research has showed that men in this patient population who received apalutamide had longer metastasis-free survival and a longer time to symptomatic progression compared with those who received placebo. This new study found that adding apalutamide still preserves HRQOL. Specifically, the group mean patient-reported outcome scores over time demonstrated HRQOL was maintained from baseline (initiation of apalutamide), and it was similar over time among men receiving apalutamide versus placebo.”

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network on Oct 9, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  • Apalutamide Maintains Health-Related QoL in Nonmetastatic CRPC

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from OncLive:

    “Treatment with apalutamide (Erleada) was not associated with a significant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with high-risk nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to patient-reported outcome (PRO) data from the phase III SPARTAN trial.

    “In the study overall, patients treated with the addition of apalutamide to standard hormone therapy also had an improvement in metastasis-free survival (MFS) and longer time to symptomatic progression compared with those who were treated with placebo.”

    Go to full article published by OncLive on Sep 17, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  • Combo Tx No Help After PSA Progression in mCRPC

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from MedPage Today:

    “Adding abiraterone acetate (Zytiga) to enzalutamide (Xtandi) did not improve progression-free survival (PFS) after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression in men on enzalutamide monotherapy for chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), researchers found.

    “In the randomized, double-blind PLATO trial, the median PFS in patients treated with enzalutamide plus abiraterone and prednisone was 5.7 months. By comparison, the PFS was 5.6 months in the control group treated with abiraterone and prednisone plus placebo (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; P=0.22).”

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today on July 28, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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Precision oncology is very complicated and changes every day. The scientists of Cancer Commons provide rapid, compassionate, scientifically sound information about best options, a remarkable free service.

Razelle Kurzrock, MD
U.C. San Diego, CureMatch, Inc.

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