clinical trial design

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from GenomeWeb curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, some clinical trials have gone virtual.

    Go to full article published by GenomeWeb.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Research paper from Cochrane Systematic Review – Intervention curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    How to follow a patient who has completed cure-intended treatment? This Cochrane review of dozens of clinical trials is a guide to confusion.

    Go to full paper published in Cochrane Systematic Review – Intervention.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “A new meta-analysis led by Dr. Joseph Unger of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has revealed that structural and clinical barriers prevent more than 3 out of 4 cancer patients from participating in clinical trials.

    “The study is part of an ongoing effort to understand why patient participation is so low in cancer clinical trials. Unger, a health services researcher and biostatistician who focuses on disparities in cancer research, published his findings today in JNCI, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.”

    Go to full article published by Fred Hutch News Service on Feb 19, 2019.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “ASCO and Friends of Cancer Research (Friends) have submitted recommended language to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for five guidance documents on ways to broaden eligibility criteria for cancer clinical trials. The recommendations are part of an ASCO and Friends collaboration to broaden eligibility for participating in clinical trials by addressing five specific areas: minimum age requirements for trial enrollment, HIV/AIDS status, brain metastases, organ dysfunction, and prior and concurrent malignancies.”

    Go to full article published by The ASCO Post on Aug 9, 2018.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “Clinical trials of new anti-cancer therapies have often excluded patients whose disease has spread to the brain or central nervous system (CNS) or, if such patients were allowed on trial, trials have often failed to clearly capture information on the drug’s effect in the brain. Today new guidelines from an international, multidisciplinary group published in the journal Lancet Oncology describe how to most appropriately address cancer patients with CNS involvement within clinical trials of anti-cancer drugs.”

    Go to full article published by ScienceDaily on Dec 30, 2017.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “When 29-year-old Carly Bastiansen was diagnosed in January 2016 with advanced pancreatic cancer, doctors told her a clinical trial was her best shot at slowing the notoriously quick-killing and hard-to-treat disease. She found one that appeared promising and went through the screening process. But the trial would not accept her.

    “ ‘Participating in a clinical trial is really my only chance at living longer,’ Bastiansen, a children’s librarian in Baltimore, said this fall as she was growing weaker. ‘To have had that option taken off the table was devastating.’ ”

    Go to full article published by The Washington Post on Dec 17, 2017.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “A quarter of newly diagnosed cancer patients 65 or older are survivors who had a prior cancer — often preventing them from participating in clinical trials, researchers from UT Southwestern’s Simmons Cancer Center have found.

    “The UT Southwestern scientists found that 11 percent of individuals ages 20-64 had a history of a prior cancer, and 25 percent of individuals 65 or older had a history of a prior cancer.

    “As the number of cancer survivors grows, more individuals are being excluded from cancer clinical trials that could benefit them when diagnosed with a second cancer.”

    Go to full article published by ScienceDaily on Nov 22, 2017.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.