GBM

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    The Importance of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells in Glioblastoma

    With: Anita Hjelmeland, PhD

    A Q&A with Anita Hjelmeland, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology at the University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine; hjelmea@uab.edu Q: The inner workings of malignant gliomas are mysterious to many of us. Why does the prognosis of patients with these tumors remain poor? A: Glioblastoma is a primary brain tumor that is treated with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. While… Read more »

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    When overall clinical trial results are presented as “medians,” obviously, the same number of patients lived longer as did those who lived less long than the median. It can be useful to study the “tail” of the long survivors for clues of combinations of treatments that  may help others. A July 2019 Journal of Neuro-Oncology paper explores this topic.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD:

    Most malignant brain tumors are gliomas, which begin in nerve-supporting cells known as glial cells. “Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most malignant of the glial tumors,” according to this comprehensive presentation about GBM. Check it out for an authoritative, up-to-date, detailed, unbiased perspective. (You may be required to register for free to view the presentation.)

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    New Glioblastoma Trial Adds Whole-Brain Irradiation to Plerixafor

    With: Lawrence Recht, MDMartin Brown, D.Phil, FASTRO

    A Q&A with Martin Brown, D.Phil, FASTRO, Emeritus Professor (mbrown@stanford.edu), and Lawrence Recht, MD, Professor, at Stanford University’s Department of Neurology (lrecht@stanford.edu) Q: The treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a serious challenge. Recurrence after initial surgery is common and subsequent treatment almost always unsuccessful. Just as “an army marches on its stomach,” GBM growth depends on blood supply. Successful use of the FDA-approved… Read more »

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “Instructing the immune system to recognize and kill tumours, an approach termed cancer immunotherapy, has transformed the clinical treatment of certain types of malignancy. Prominent among these therapies are immune-checkpoint inhibitors, which block the action of proteins that dampen immune-cell responses against tumours. For example, antibodies can be used to interfere with the inhibitory protein PD-1, which is present on T cells, a type of immune cell that attacks tumours. Immune-checkpoint inhibitors have been most successfully used to treat cancers, such as melanomas, that are well infiltrated by T cells and have a large number of genetic mutationsA subset of these mutations might generate neoantigens — altered protein sequences that are uniquely produced in cancer cells and are recognized as foreign by the immune system.”

    Go to full article published by Nature on Dec 19, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    A new study from Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki and the Finnish Cancer Registry shows that survival after glioblastoma has improved since the millennium. The improvement in survival was, however, modest in elderly patients, raising concerns whether current treatment strategies are optimal for this patient group.

    “Glioblastoma is the most common brain , and one of the deadliest cancers known. Unfortunately, there is no cure for these rapidly progressing tumors.”

    Go to full article published by Medical Xpress on Oct 16, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Cancer Network:

    “Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) appears to be safe and effective for glioblastomas in select patients and may add an average of 2 months to life expectancy compared with the current standard of care, according to a new report published in the journal Neurosurgery.

    ” ‘We showed that the procedure is well tolerated and that recurrent patients had a meaningful clinical benefit that seems to be better when compared with previously published data on the current standard of care,’ said Eric Leuthardt, MD, senior study author and a professor of neurosurgery, neuroscience, biomedical engineering, and mechanical engineering & applied science at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.”

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network on Sep 7, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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    Options to Treat a Glioblastoma

    With: Al Musella, DPM

    Please see our updated version of this article from Oct 1, 2020. A Q&A with Al Musella, DPM, President, Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc., Hewlett, NY; email: musella@virtualtrials.com, phone: 888-295-4740 Q: You direct an established foundation that supports research and information about brain tumors. What would you do if you yourself were diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)? A: Now… Read more »

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt from Targeted Oncology:

    “The first patient has been dosed in a phase I/II open-label, multicenter trial investigating a novel immunotherapy combination in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). Fifty patients have been accrued in the trial, as of May 31, 2018, which will be conducted at 25 sites across the nation.

    “This study aims to investigate the efficacy of INO-5401, a T-cell activating immunotherapy agent encoding multiple antigens in GBM, and INO-9012, an immune activator encoding IL-12, in combination with the PD-1 inhibitor cemiplimab (REGN2810).”

    Go to full article published by Targeted Oncology on July 9, 2018.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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    Reengineering Immune System Cells to Treat Glioblastoma

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a serious diagnosis. The search for better treatments is ongoing, but with little to show since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of the chemotherapy drug temozolomide with concurrent radiation 12 years ago, based on data showing modest improvement in patients’ survival. By now, a new cancer treatment approach known as CAR T-cell therapy is famous… Read more »