immunotherapy

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    A blog post from the National Cancer Institute reports that two clinical trials are showing encouraging results for progression-free survival—and one for overall survival—from treatment with immunotherapy drugs in people with advanced esophageal cancer. 

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from The ASCO Post curated by Contributing Editor George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Recent clinical trial results show that immunotherapy—a type of treatment that boosts the immune system to fight cancer—provided long-lasting, improved outcomes for patients with advanced cervical or endometrial cancer. These are important findings for difficult-to-treat cancers.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Press release from Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center curated by Contributing Editor George Lundberg, MD.

    This press release outlines promising preliminary results from two phase 2 clinical trials testing the drug balstilimab alone or in combination with zalifrelimab.

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    Is Cancer the Best Way to Die?

    With: Richard Smith, CBE, FMedSci

    In 2014, the prestigious medical research journal The BMJ published a controversial piece called “Dying of cancer is the best death.” Here, our Curious Dr. George asks the author of that piece, Richard Smith, CBE, FMedSci, if and how his thoughts on death have since evolved. Dr. Smith was Editor of The BMJ from 1991 to 2004 and is currently Chair of the Lancet Commission… Read more »

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from MedPage Today curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Chemotherapy in the form of a single drug (as opposed to a combination of drugs) remains the best treatment for relapsed, platinum-resistant, serous, epithelial ovarian cancer. However, clinical trials are exploring new targeted therapy and immunotherapy options for this disease.

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Research paper from the Journal of Clinical Oncology curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Eighty percent of ovarian cancers are first diagnosed after they have already spread. In the clinical trial discussed in this paper, a combination of two checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy drugs showed only modest benefit in advanced ovarian cancer.

    Go to full paper published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from Targeted Oncology curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    Once bladder cancer has infiltrated the muscle wall in elderly patients, it becomes challenging to treat. New drugs and immunotherapies show some promise.

    Go to full article published by Targeted Oncology.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.

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    Using Molecular Testing to Guide Treatment for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    With: Kalpana Kannan, PhD

    A Q&A with Kalpana Kannan, PhD, former Scientist at Cancer Commons Q: Colorectal cancer is common, and although many cases in earlier stages are cured by surgery alone or with adjuvant chemotherapy, it is still a lethal threat for many patients. Nonetheless, several new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents are now available. When should patients receive molecular testing for their colorectal cancer, what information should… Read more »

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    Can You Improve Your Response to Certain Immunotherapy Drugs?

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Cancer treatments that use a strategy called immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) have entered clinical practice in a big way, with six drugs now approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a variety of cancers. These drugs release “brakes” on the immune system, boosting its ability to kill cancer cells. Specifically, they target the proteins PD-1 or CTLA-4, which are found on… Read more »

  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “People with a type of skin cancer who consumed a high-fiber diet responded better to immunotherapy treatment than those with poorer diets, according to data presented at a media preview of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting.

    “Melanoma is a type of skin cancer which although very treatable if caught early, still kills approximately 9,000 Americans a year, mainly people who are diagnosed a more advanced stage of disease where the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.”

    Go to full article published by Forbes on Feb 27, 2019.

    If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to get support from Cancer Commons.