Non-small cell lung cancer

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from MedPage Today curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a liquid biopsy test (a type of biopsy that uses a blood draw instead of surgery) for detecting whether patients have EGFR mutations in their metastatic lung tumors, which could help guide treatment options.

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Research highlight from Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    This year’s virtual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology featured presentations on several different targeted therapies that appear to provide improved outcomes for lung cancer patients.

    Go to full research highlight published by Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from Cancer Network curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes: 

    The drug osimertinib (brand name Tagrisso) is beneficial as an adjuvant therapy—treatment given in addition to tumor-removal surgery—for patients with stage IB–IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has a mutation in the EGFR gene.

    Go to full article published by Cancer Network.

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  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Article from OncLive curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes:

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved another new drug for people with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors that have high levels of a protein called PD-L1.

    Go to full article published by OncLive.

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    What’s New in Immunotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

    Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Chemotherapy was once the only treatment option for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). But five years ago, immunotherapy—treatment that boosts a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer—came on… Read more »

  •   George Lundberg, MD

    Curated by Editor in Chief George Lundberg, MD, who notes:

    Lung cancer kills more Americans than any other cancer. Often caused by tobacco smoking, it can also occur in non-smokers. To learn more, read this authoritative, up-to-date, in-depth, detailed, and comprehensive report on non-small cell lung cancer from Medscape.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “On April 11, 2019, the Food and Drug Administration approved pembrolizumab (KEYTRUDA, Merck Inc.) for the first-line treatment of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are not candidates for surgical resection or definitive chemoradiation or metastatic NSCLC. Patients’ tumors must have no EGFR or ALK genomic aberrations and express PD-L1 (Tumor Proportion Score [TPS] ≥1%) determined by an FDA-approved test.

    “Pembrolizumab was previously approved as a single agent for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic NSCLC whose tumors express PD-L1 TPS ≥50%.”

    Go to full article published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on April 11, 2019.

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    Excerpt:

    “Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) yielded a surprisingly low pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in a phase II trial of operable, early-stage lung cancer patients, raising questions about SABR alone in this setting.

    “In the first study to examine neoadjuvant SABR prior to surgery in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), SABR yielded a 60% pCR rate at 10 weeks post-radiation (95% CI 44%-76%), a rate far lower than hypothesized when the trial was designed, reported David Palma, MD, PhD, of the London Health Sciences Centre in London, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues, in JAMA Oncology.”

    Go to full article published by MedPage Today on Feb 22, 2019.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    The Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP), the first precision medicine trial in lung cancer supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is undergoing a major expansion to include patients with all non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs).

    “The trial previously tested treatments for people with advanced-stage squamous cell lung cancer. Opening the trial to all types of advanced-stage NSCLCs means that thousands of new patients will be eligible to enroll.”

    Go to full article published by The ASCO Post on Feb 1, 2019.

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  •   Emma Shtivelman, PhD

    Excerpt:

    “On November 2, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to lorlatinib (LORBRENA, Pfizer, Inc.) for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has progressed on crizotinib and at least one other ALK inhibitor for metastatic disease or whose disease has progressed on alectinib or ceritinib as the first ALK inhibitor therapy for metastatic disease.

    “Approval was based on a subgroup of 215 patients with ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC, previously treated with one or more ALK kinase inhibitors, enrolled in a non‑randomized, dose-ranging and activity-estimating, multi‑cohort, multicenter study (Study B7461001; NCT01970865). The major efficacy measures were overall response rate (ORR) and intracranial ORR, according to RECIST 1.1, as assessed by an independent central review committee.”

    Go to full article published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Dec 14, 2018.

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